Food Security

Eliot Coleman

Organic farming showcases the inherent generosity of the earth.

The creation of the organic farming method, starting in the 1920s and 30s, was a gift to the world from the combined efforts of many inspired farmers, researchers, and advocates for good food.

Those organic pioneers accomplished a small miracle. Few today are aware of the true significance of that organic miracle. It goes far beyond avoiding chemicals and pesticides. It offers universal access to food for everyone.

Up until organic farming popularized a new reality, the industrial-scale-chemical-input-dependent-pesticide-laden-capital-intensive-top-down-commercial-exploitive model of food production was the only game in town. Even though human access to food was wholly dependent upon that industrial model, public participation was seriously inhibited by the cost and the complexity of such a process. The organic revolution changed all that forever.


Organic growing makes food production, when based on natural processes, accessible to anyone anywhere with no more resources than a shovel, a hoe, and a small plot of ground.


Organic growing demonstrated a natural/biological understanding of soil fertility and plant growth. It brought the creation of food back down to earth and into the hands of the people. Organic growing makes food production, when based on natural processes, accessible to anyone anywhere with no more resources than a shovel, a hoe, and a small plot of ground. If you are hungry and willing to do some work, the food will happen dependably.

There are three legs to this miracle:

First is compost. The world’s best soil improver is made for free in your backyard from decomposed plant and animal wastes. There is nothing to buy. Compost happens. Adding compost to the soil nourishes the vital micro-biological life that powers all plant growth.

Second, when you combine composted soil with age-old proven pest management techniques like crop rotation and cover crops, you have the foundation for a stable, highly productive, self-perpetuating system.

And, third, if you use open-pollinated heirloom seeds, that cannot be controlled or denied to you because they are easily reproducible members of the public domain, you are set to feed exceptional food to yourself and your neighbors in perpetuity.

The answer to food security is in your hands.